Cycle Publishing
Van der Plas Publicatiaons
 

1282 7th Avenue
San Francisco
CA94122, USA


Tel.: (415) 665-8214

 

 

Cycling for Profit

How to Make a Living With Your Bike
by Jim Gregory

Format: 5½ x 8 inch trade paperback
Description: 144 pages with 50 black & white photographs and other illustrations
ISBN: 1-892495-12-0
Price: US$14.95

Click here to order from Amazon.com

  • How to start a bike-based business
  • The kind of work that's available
  • Equipment needs for various types of work
  • Business practices and equipment
  • How to market your service
  • How to hire and manage employees
  • How to keep your business in the black

The only book of its kind: shows how to set up and run a bicycle-based business. Only a few copies left: get yours before they're all gone!


About the book

You don't need to be a professional racer to succeed at making your living by bike. This book shows the many ways it can be done and how to go about making your business flourish. The author draws upon his own experience as well as that of fellow bike-based businesses around the world.

The first part of the book covers the various kind of bicycle-powered operations that are open to full-time and part-time employment, listing what kind of equipment is needed and the practical aspects of marketing and operations.

The second part of the book describes the specific requirements and modes of operation for each particular kind of business.
 


About the author

Jim Gregory is co-owner and founder of Fresh Aire Delivery Services in Ames, Iowa, a bicycle-powered delivery service that handles anything from straightforward parcel pickup and delivery to furniture moving. His business has grown from a small one-person part-time venture to a full-time operation employing two people full-time and seven part-time all that in a small community in the middle of Iowa, proving that anyone armed with the information in this book can succeed in cycling for profit.
 


Table of Contents
 
Introduction

PART I. BASIC INFORMATION
1. Commercial Cycling
Why Work as a Commercial Cyclist?
Commercial Cycling as a Business
The Disadvantages of Commercial Cycling

2. Getting Started
Identifying Local Opportunities
Full Time or Part Time?
The Advantages and Disadvantages of Self-Employment
Equipment Needs
Startup Costs

3. Basic Equipment
Choosing a Bike
Accessories
Trailer or Cargo Bike?

4. Communication Equipment
Answering Machine
Pagers
Cellular Phones
Online Service7

5. Insurance and Bonding
Cargo Insurance
General Liability Insurance

6. Marketing
Gaining Credibility
Applying and Interviewing for a Job
Cold-calling Potential Customers
Advertising your Business with Flyers
Brochures
Business Cards
Getting Free Publicity
Classified Ads
Yellow Pages Ad
Display Advertising
Other forms of Advertising
7. How to Keep Your Business in the Black
Use Time Efficiently
Watch Costs
Do Not Undercharge
Keep Records Up-to-Date
Bill Customers Promptly
Watch Overdue Accounts
Track Advertising

8. Hiring and Managing Employees
Employees or Independent Contractors?
Employee Costs
Employee Paperwork
Hiring Employees

PART II. DOING THE WORK
9. Jobs Requiring Only a Bicycle
Pizza Delivery
Airline Ticket Delivery
Document and Small Package Delivery
Pharmaceutical Delivery

10. Jobs Requiring a Cargo Bike or a Trailer
Grocery Delivery
Newspaper Distribution
Commercial Cargo Hauling
Mail Delivery
Furniture Moving
Bicycle Transport
Beverage Can Collecting
Mobile Service
Mobile Bicycle Repair
Ice Cream Vending
Pedicabbing
Recycling Service

Appendix

Bibliography
Index

 
From the contents

Mail delivery service vehicles in Manchester, England.


 


Unloading mail bins at Bikes at Work in Ames, IA.